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EasyTel GenieBank Safety Tips about Fraud

Important Notice
Occasionally, some of our subscribers receive emails and phone calls from parties claiming to be from EasyTel or GenieBank Customer Service, requesting sensitive information. These are fraudulent messages not sent by EasyTel or GenieBank. We encourage our subscribers to review the following recommendations.

EasyTel and GenieBank takes the security and privacy of your personal and account information very seriously. EasyTel and GenieBank will never send you an e-mail or call you asking for confidential information such as account numbers, Genie Numbers, passwords, PIN numbers, ATM or credit card numbers or social security numbers.

Protect yourself from fraudulent e-mails and telephone calls claiming to be from EasyTel  or GenieBank. Delete unsolicited e-mails that ask for this type of personal information. If you suspect you have provided confidential information to a fraudulent site or telephone solicitor, contact EasyTel Customer Service by calling 877-Easytel (877-327-9835).

You can also report e-mail fraud claiming to be from GenieBank by attaching the suspicious message to an email addressed to: Safety@GenieBank.com

Frequently Asked Questions

E-Mail & Online Fraud
What is E-Mail Fraud?
How do I recognize fraudulent email?
What do I do if I receive a fraudulent email?
I already responded. What do I do now?

Computer Viruses
What do viruses have to do with fraud?
How do I protect myself?

Telephone Fraud
What is Telephone Fraud?
How do I protect myself?

The GenieBank ATM Card
GenieBank ATM Security
General Card & PIN Security
Using your GenieBank ATM Card Safely

Identity Theft
What is Identity Theft?
How do I protect myself?

Other Information Sources
Alerting a Credit Bureau
Lost or Stolen GenieBank cards

 

 

 

 

 

E-mail and Online Fraud
Messages sent by email are not secure and may be intercepted by outside parties. Do not use email or instant messenger to send communications that contains your confidential information.

What is e-mail fraud?
The most common type of e-mail fraud is a phony e-mail message sent to you for the purpose of stealing your personal and financial information. Also known as "phishing" or "spoofing", fraud e-mail is commonly used by criminals to gain access to your existing accounts or to use your personal and financial information to open new accounts.

These messages are disguised as legitimate e-mail from a source you trust, and are designed to trick you into to giving up personal and confidential information, such as online IDs and passwords, Social Security numbers and bank or credit account numbers.

 

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How do I recognize fraudulent e-mail?
Spotting phony e-mail messages is not always easy. In addition, the criminals who use them are becoming more and more sophisticated in creating them.

Phony e-mail messages may ask you to reply to them directly or they may ask you to click on a link that takes you to a bogus Web site that appears legitimate. In either case, they will generally ask you to provide sensitive personal, financial or account information.

Here are some things you should know about phony e-mails and some tips for spotting them:

Urgent appeals. Frequently these e-mails make some form of urgent appeal, for example, stating that your account may be closed if you fail to confirm, verify or authenticate your personal information immediately.

General greetings. Bogus e-mails often provide a general greeting and don't identify you by name. For example, it may start with "Dear valued GenieBank customer." Or they may identify you as if your email address IS your name, such as "Dear JSmith".

Accusations of fraud. Sometimes these emails imply that YOU are suspected of fraud, or that someone is using your account fraudulently. The idea is to make you panic and "prove" your innocence by cooperating as quickly as possible.

Typos and other errors. Fraudulent e-mails or Web sites often contain typographical or grammatical errors. The writing may be awkward, stilted or inappropriate. The visual or design quality may be poor. HOWEVER, many such messages and web sites are WELL written. Errors are a sign of a fraudulent site, but good writing does NOT mean a message or site is legitimate.

 

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What do I do if I receive a fraudulent email?
 

Don't Do
Donít take anything for granted. Always remember that forging e-mails and creating bogus Web sites is not difficult. Confirm ANY request for sensitive personal, financial or account information, particularly if they are made with an urgent or threatening tone. Phone the supposed sender on a number you already know. Call GenieBank directly to confirm requests for updating or verifying personal or account information.
Donít click on links in an e-mail message asking for sensitive personal, financial or account information. Those links may look right but may take you somewhere else entirely. Go to the web site directly. Open a new browser window, type in the Web address (such as www.GenieBank.com). Check to see if you must actually perform any activity that an e-mail may be asking you to do, for example, change a password.
Donít share your IDs or passwords with anyone. Always sign off Web sites or secure areas of Web sites (for example, Online Banking) for which you use an ID and password to enter.
Donít PANIC! Most fraudulent emails are designed to make you act quickly without thinking about what you are doing. When your computer is not in use, shut it down or disconnect it from the Internet.



Donít take anything for granted. Always remember that forging e-mails and creating bogus Web sites is not difficult. Confirm ANY request for sensitive personal, financial or account information, particularly if they are made with an urgent or threatening tone. Phone the supposed sender on a number you already know. Call GenieBank directly to confirm requests for updating or verifying personal or account information.

Donít click on links in an e-mail message asking for sensitive personal, financial or account information. Those links may look right but may take you somewhere else entirely. Go to the web site directly. Open a new browser window, type in the Web address (such as www.GenieBank.com). Check to see if you must actually perform any activity that an e-mail may be asking you to do, for example, change a password.

Donít share your IDs or passwords with anyone. Always sign off Web sites or secure areas of Web sites (for example, Online Banking) for which you use an ID and password to enter.

Donít PANIC! Most fraudulent emails are designed to make you act quickly without thinking about what you are doing. When your computer is not in use, shut it down or disconnect it from the Internet.

I already responded. What do I do now?
If you think you may have provided personal or account information in response to a fraudulent e-mail or Web site, report the fraud via e-mail to Safety@GenieBank.com, change your passwords and monitor your account activity frequently. DO NOT include sensitive information such as credit card numbers in your email!

You should also check with the various Credit Bureaus and put fraud alerts on your accounts if you suspect illegal activity. (See the section on Alerting Credit Bureaus below)
 

 

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Computer Viruses

What do viruses have to do with fraud?
With email fraud, someone is trying to trick YOU into giving up information. With computer viruses (and their associates like worms, Trojan horses and more) hackers can make your COMPUTER give them that information without you ever knowing it. Or they can just destroy the information you have.
 

How do I protect myself?

  • Anti-virus protection. Make sure your computer has an anti-virus protection program installed to reduce the risk of your computer becoming infected. Many fine programs are available for very low prices. Check with your local computer store.

  • Automatic upgrades. New viruses are being written every day. Be sure that you purchase a program that automatically upgrades your virus protection on a recurring basis. If you currently do not have this automatic upgrade feature, make sure you update your virus detection program at least weekly, and immediately when you hear of a new virus.

  • Attachments. We advise that you not open attachments or diskettes unless you are certain that you can trust the source. If someone sends you something unexpectedly, check with that person directly to make sure it really is from them BEFORE you open it. Learn how to manually screen diskettes and attachments if your anti-virus software does not automatically screen for viruses.

     

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Telephone Fraud

What is Telephone Fraud?

Telephone fraud comes in two major forms.

  1. Someone on the phone may simply be trying to trick you into buying some product or service that you don't really want, or that is not worth the money they want.

  2. Or, like the other types of fraud we have talked about, someone may be trying to get your sensitive information so they can use it for themselves.

Be especially careful about deals that sound too good to be true, and keep these tips in mind:

  • Do not give any private information over the phone to someone who called you.

  • Always feel free to say, "I'm not interested," and hang up.

  • If you're actually interested, get a number and ask to call the salesman back.

  • DON'T RUSH IN! Be wary of high-pressure sales tactics, especially if the sale "must be made now".

  • Try never to use words like "yes" when speaking to a phone salesman. They may record your voice and edit the tape to "prove" that you agreed to their sales pitch. "Is this Mrs. Smith?" and "Yes", becomes "Would you like a year's supply of dog biscuits for $5,000?" followed by "Yes" in your voice!

  • Make sure your Universal Office and your GenieMail is secure, and promptly remove emails you no longer need and messages youíve listened to.
     

 

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The GenieBank ATM Card
The GenieBank ATM Card is unsurpassed in offering global access at more than a million ATMs in more than 150 countries. The GenieBank ATM Cards provide convenient cash access, generally 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to cardholders worldwide. GenieBank ATM Cards provide a safe, quick, and convenient way to access cash worldwide.

The Universal Office ATM Card works at any ATM with the following logo's.

       



GenieBank ATM Security
When your card has become stuck inside of the ATM machine, be suspicious of anyone offering their help, even if they appear to be a bank security officer. Criminals can obtain your PIN by several means (shoulder surfing or straight forward questioning), then retrieve your jammed card from the ATM and use it to withdraw funds.

When traveling it is advisable that you only take one ATM card and memorize the PIN.

General Card & PIN Safety

  • Report all your lost or stolen credit cards or ATM Cards immediately.

  • If you suspect that an unauthorized party has your Genie password, please change your password immediately. You can change your password by accessing your Genie on the telephone or by logging in on the Internet.

  • Protect your GenieBank ATM cards as if they were cash ó never let them out of your sight.

  • Never write down your PIN ó memorize it. Do NOT use easy to guess passwords or PIN numbers such as 1234 or 5555.

 

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Using your GenieBank ATM card Safely

When using your GenieBank ATM card, remember to adhere to some important Tips for Safe ATM Usage described below. Observing these pointers and exercising caution will help protect you from fraud.
 

  • Look around and observe your surroundings - if the machine is poorly lit, or is in a hidden area, use another ATM.

  • Have your card ready - avoid having to go through your wallet or purse to find your card.

  • Make sure that anyone waiting to use the ATM after you cannot see you entering your PIN or transaction amount.

  • Don't count your cash while standing at the ATM - put your cash, card, and receipt away immediately.

  • Cancel your transaction and leave immediately if you see anything suspicious. Confirm, as soon as possible, with GenieBank that the transaction was canceled.

  • If you are using an indoor ATM that requires your card to open the door, avoid letting anyone come in with you that you do not know.

  • Lock the car doors and roll up the other windows when you use a drive-through ATM.

  • Do not leave your keys or valuables in the car when using an ATM - and do not leave your car engine running.

  • After completing an ATM or Debit transaction, remember to take your card and any transaction record. Do not leave your receipt behind - take it with you. Compare your ATM receipts to the cash you received from the ATM.

  • If you lose your GenieBank ATM card, contact GenieBank immediately by calling 800-783-0000.


     

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Identity Theft

What is Identity Theft?
Identity theft is the FASTEST GROWING crime in the world! Identity theft happens when someone steals personal information such as your bank account number or Social Security number and then uses this information illegally. The crime may be as simple as withdrawing money from your account, and charging items to your credit card, or as complicated as pretending to be you while opening new accounts, buying cars, jewelry, real estate and more.

How do I protect myself?
Take these precautions to protect your information:

  1. Be discriminating when providing personal information such as Social Security number and account or credit card information over the telephone, in person or on the Internet. Don't give out this information unless you are sure with whom you are dealing.

  2. Protect your Social Security number and the Social Security numbers of your children and other family members by not carrying them in your wallet.

  3. Don't use your Social Security number as an account or drivers license number. Ask your state's Drivers License office to issue you a random ID number. Do the same with Doctor's offices, insurance companies and the like.

  4. Report lost or stolen checks, credit or debit cards immediately. Your bank should be able to block payment on the check numbers or account numbers involved.

  5. Store cancelled checks, new checks and account statements in a safe place.

  6. Notify your banker of suspicious phone inquiries such as those asking account information to "verify a statement" or "award a prize."

  7. Review your credit report at least once every year. Make sure all information is up-to-date and accurate.

  8. Memorize your PIN (Personal Identification Number) and refrain from writing it, your Social Security number or credit card number on a check.

  9. Tear up or shred any pre-approved credit offers to which you do not respond. Thieves can use these offers to assume your identity.

  10. Keep mail secure. Don't mail bills or sensitive information from your home or unsecured mailboxes. Retrieve and review your mail promptly. Thieves may use the personal information contained in your mail to steal your identity.

  11. If you do not receive your regular bills when expected, call the company to find out why.

  12. Review your monthly account statements thoroughly. Investigate suspicious items immediately to head off any possible fraud before it occurs.

  13. Shred old records before you discard them. Thieves can fish through your trash and pull out old bank and credit cards statements to get your account numbers.

  14. Do not carry your Social Security card, passport or birth certificate unless needed that day.
     

 

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Other information sources
Learn more at the Federal Trade Commission http://www.consumer.gov/idtheft/ and the National Consumer League for Fraud Websites http://www.fraud.org/
 

Alerting a credit bureau
If you suspect you might be a victim of identity theft, contact any of the three major credit bureaus to place a fraud alert on your credit file. You also can order a credit report to identify any unauthorized activity.
ē Equifax - http://www.equifax.com  1-800-525-6285
ē Experian - http://www.experian.com 1-888-397-3742
ē Trans Union - http://www.transunion.com 
1-800-680-7289
 

Lost or stolen GenieBank ATM cards
ē Report your lost or stolen ATM card immediately.
ē In the United States and Canada, call 800-783-0000
ē From other international destinations, call 702-939-4800

 

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